CITES : Elephants, giraffes and otters must be protected!

From 17 to 28 August 2018, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will take place. This Cop18 is a must-see, with important decisions to be made about the welfare of many species, such as African elephants, giraffes, saiga antelopes and otters from Asia. Change of annex, stop of export of the living species, quota of individuals to slaughter for trophy hunts ... Chapter Animals explains you our expectations of this conference!

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  CITES - It's time to protect African elephants :  

From 17 to 28 August 2018, the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) will take place. This Cop18 is a must-see, with important decisions to be made about the welfare of many species, such as African elephants, giraffes, saiga antelopes and otters from Asia. Change of annex, stop of export of the living species, quota of individuals to slaughter for trophy hunts ... Chapter Animals explains you our expectations of this conference!

One of the main fights of this convention is to fight to protect African elephants. Listed in Appendix I since 1989, its trade - of living or dead individuals - is illegal. Its protection status is therefore unique. However, in 1997, Botswana, Namibia and Zimbabwe obtained their elephant population transferred to Appendix II, which now provides for a hunting quota and the marketing of ivory. In 2000, South Africa in turn obtained the transfer of elephant from Appendix I to II. And if that were not enough, these four African countries are proposing to further lighten the protection of elephants in order to sell even more ivory. A shame.

A dozen countries, including Burkina Faso, Côte d'Ivoire, Gabon, Kenya, Liberia, Nigeria, Syria, Sudan and Togo, propose to reintegrate the elephant population of the four countries into the world. Annex I in order to protect, as it should, this species which is already very endangered. These same countries propose, in particular, to prohibit the sale of elephants to zoos. Species collection for long-term captivity since, for the last 20 years, 200 elephants have been separated from their herds to be sold to various zoos around the world. We also recall that African circus elephants come from these same countries, be it Tania, Betty, Rosa, Bambi, Mambo or Betty. A proposal that should not please the U.E, the United States, Canada or even China - main customers.

On the Asian continent, African otters and otters will be at the heart of the debate. The two species listed in Appendix II should be able to change the schedule and go to Appendix I. Considered a cute and "fashionable" animal, the otter is seen by many as a pet. Nevertheless, it is not the case. The many themed cafes and bars on otters, but also on hedgehogs, owls, snakes, meerkats and many other exotic species, allowing guests to touch, pet and play with existing captive individuals in Indonesia , in Japan and in some countries are only increasing demand and illegal catches in order to domesticate them. Therefore, in order to properly punish poaching, it is essential that the schedule of species change.

In the United States, it is the saiga that lives, maybe its last years if no decision is taken immediately. Its transfer from Appendix II to the first is essential for the survival of the species. Considered critically endangered by IUCN, the saiga could become extinct in the wild in a few years. The poaching, its meat and the trade of the horns could annihilate the species definitively. His protection must be changed.

Back in Africa, the giraffe could end up on Schedule II. Its population, in 20 years, has decreased from 40 to 90% depending on the region. A rapid decline, yet silent compared to that of rhinos, elephants and lions. Poaching, its use for meat, trophies, bones, local superstitions ... The giraffe is still being killed. Its inclusion in Annex II would allow monitoring of quotas and imports / exports to other countries in the world. This proposal is supported by the 32 African countries members of the African elephant coalition, recalling that all subspecies of giraffes are affected by the same problem, for a low rate of reproduction.

Let's not forget that rhinos will also be involved, as Eswatini and Namibia are proposing to move their populations under different appendices in order to better manage the regulation of the species. Namibia wishes to increase the population of its country from Annex I to II, with specific annotations for live animal trade and trophy hunting. Eswatini offers a trade of horns and skin. Of course, we are totally opposed to this change of status for the Southern White Rhinoceros, which is seriously declining.

 

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  WHAT WILL YOUR DONATION SERVE?  

Your donation can be used to fund our sanctuary for big cats, even as South Africa tries to legalize more and more breeding farms for canned hunting. Hunting, boxed or trophies, do not help people to regulate. Like elephants and rhinos, we fight every day to stop this stupid belief and ask for Appendix I listing of all species.

 

Thanks to you, we could :

- Carry out campaigns for the opening of our structures / sanctuaries.

- Call for the ban on canned hunting.

- Request, through our local partners, the listing of endangered species in Appendix I.

- Stop the poaching of endangered species, the export of trophies and live individuals.

 

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